Category Archives: People Management

Please don’t say “I’m only a ….”

succession

In many conversations I’ve heard people – often women – describe themselves in this way. Every time, I cringe because of all this phrase implies. Even if that’s not what you meant it to mean.

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When you say, for example, ‘I’m just a receptionist’, notice what you are saying to the world – and yourself. It sounds like you believe:

  1. The work of a receptionist is not very important;
  2. You think you could/should be doing a more important job; and
  3. This is not the job you would choose to do if you had a choice.

Whichever way you look at it these are negative messages if you believe them. What if you had some other beliefs instead. Beliefs like these:

  • All work is important;
  • You do have a choice – perhaps not in the short term, but definitely in the long term; and
  • How you feel about your job is affected by how you talk about it to others. You don’t need to do that to yourself!

Everyone has a handful of jobs they are ‘born to do’. If you are lucky enough to have found what that is for you and you’re in that job, no matter how lowly you perceive it to be, please don’t talk it down.

On the other hand, if you really do hate your job and wish you weren’t doing it, you can express that without denigrating the role in general or the industry you work in.

Some industries have trouble attracting younger people. Part of the reason is that people already working in those industries just don’t promote what they do in a positive way – even when they do love their jobs!

No wonder young people, if they do happen to find their way into these jobs, often have no idea of what they’re getting into. They have probably never met anyone with experience in the role who has told them what it’s really like – both good and bad.

Next time someone asks you ‘What do you do?’ please remove the ‘only’ or the ‘just’ from your answer, even if you feel your work is insignificant.

By speaking about your job as if it’s important – because every job is! – you’ll feel better about it. You might even be the catalyst to someone else finding the career of their dreams because you didn’t talk it down.

What do you think?

What’s your story? #9: Santa Claus

What's your story?

We have a very special guest for our December career story – Santa Claus!

Santa Claus

What’s your current position and what do you do?

My position has different titles in different parts of the world, but I am effectively the CEO of a global gift manufacturing and distribution business. This job involves a huge variety of tasks including

  • Reading lots of mail
  • Checking who’s been naughty and nice
  • Overseeing the manufacturing and packaging operations
  • Managing a huge workforce who work long hours in freezing conditions
  • Coordinating the other Santas who help out in my place leading up to Christmas
  • Liaising with retail outlets and hospitality establishments worldwide
  • Delivering toys personally using a unique form of transport
  • Training and caring for a team of reindeer

In addition to these tasks, I am often called upon for guest appearances on television, in movies, on billboards and magazine covers, in parades and advertisements. I also occasionally find time to visit Christmas parties and hospitals.

What other activities are you involved in?

With the demands of my role, I have to pay close attention to my health and fitness. It’s rather tricky to maintain my rotund shape while still ensuring I can fit in the sleigh and down chimneys. Fortunately, the hard work before December 24 keeps me healthy while the generous amounts of milk, cookies, beer and fruitcake I consume on my rounds keep me ‘in shape’.

Can you tell us about a significant turning point in your career?

After the early years, when I was less well-known in English-speaking countries, the portraits of me by American cartoonist Thomas Nast in the second half of the 19th century were a significant turning point. My appearance as ‘Jolly Old Santa Claus’ in his drawings, like the one above, led to my greater popularity and the success I enjoy today.

Who has inspired you?

In the 3rd century, a monk – who eventually became St Nicholas – started the tradition of giving in secret. Here’s the story of how it started, from whychristmas.com:

“There was a poor man who had three daughters. He was so poor, he did not have enough money for a dowry, so his daughters couldn’t get married.One night, Nicholas secretly dropped a bag of gold down the chimney and into the house The bag fell into a stocking that had been hung by the fire to dry! This was repeated later with the second daughter. Finally, determined to discover the person who had given him the money, the father secretly hid by the fire every evening until he caught Nicholas dropping in a bag of gold. Nicholas begged the man to not tell anyone what he had done, because he did not want to bring attention to himself. But soon the news got out and when anyone received a secret gift, it was thought that maybe it was from Nicholas.”

I am proud to be able to carry on his tradition!

Finally, what would you tell your younger self about work and careers?

You never know how long a job will last! I’ve been very lucky because anyone who brings joy and delight to the face of a child will always be in demand. If you are willing to give without the expectation of receiving anything in return, who can tell what sort of career may be ahead of you?

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all our readers!

5 easy ways to boost staff morale over the holidays

staff morale

Nothing kills a sale faster than grumpy or disinterested staff. Whatever type of customer-facing business you run, you can’t afford to have the morale of your staff turn away customers during the peak holiday season.

Here are five ideas to keep your staff motivated while they’re working hard.

1. Communicate

Let staff know what to do, how they should do it and by when. Have clear goals that are easy for all employees to understand and rules that are easy for them to follow. For example, they should know if you value efficiency above customer care or if both are a priority.

Set goals for sales figures, but remember to notice when they are going above and beyond your expectations to please your customers.

2. Educate

It’s frustrating for customers when your staff don’t appear to know their jobs or your products or menu, and it’s embarrassing for your employees. Investing time in training will result in more confident staff and better sales figures.

When you train on the job, constantly observe and assess new team members and give them constructive feedback. If you notice something wrong, correct them in private, let it go and move on.

3. Challenge

Your staff are at the frontline, so they know better than anyone what is and isn’t working. Ask them for their input and ideas. This simple form of recognition can be a big morale booster because it shows you value your employees as partners in the process. You can reward the best suggestion with a prize if competitions and contests motivate your staff.

Asking for their input also helps them to feel part of a team that is working towards a common goal — even if that goal is simply surviving the rush!

4. Appreciate

You can let your employees know that you appreciate the extra effort they put in over the holidays by rewarding them in ways additional to simply paying them.

A simple, genuine ‘thank you’ or other verbal recognition of a job well done can help them go the extra mile when needed. Other low-cost ways of showing your gratitude and keeping them energised include providing free snacks and coffee or paying for their parking.

5. Motivate

When thinking of rewards such as higher commissions or bonuses, consider how you will measure success. If you run a sales contest, for example, will all the team receive a bonus when the business meets the overall target? Consider a grand prize for the top performer in sales, customer service, teamwork or ideas — or all. One business we know even gives a prize for the person showing the most Christmas cheer on their busiest days.

Finally, if you know your team well, you can make your rewards more personal and, therefore, more motivating. Some may appreciate ‘gold class’ movie tickets over a party or public recognition. Others may get a real boost out of seeing their achievements complimented on your Facebook business page. Your cheerful, friendly and helpful staff are the key to reaching your holiday sales targets — and staying sane. By aligning business goals, personal motivation and rewards, you ‘ll find the winning combination for high staff morale.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

 

5 tips to manage your staff during the holiday rush

career help

For many businesses, including retail and hospitality, the holiday season brings many opportunities. Increased traffic, a higher turnover of stock and – if all goes to plan – higher profits. One of the challenges, however, can be managing your staff.

If the holiday season means increased traffic for your business, here are some tips to help you manage the needs of your staff – and keep customers happy so you can make the most of the holiday spending spree.

1. Plan ahead

While you probably know from past experience when to expect a rush, determine what specific days and times will likely be the busiest. Consider checking other variables, such as the schedule for nearby events or the weather forecast if they could affect your rush times.

When planning, also review the employment rules in your industry and make a list of good sources of casual and temporary staff. (Tip: Ask your current employees.)

2. Manage all leave in advance

Determine, communicate and stick to your criteria so you are not only fair but also transparent.

As far as possible ensure that:

  • Leave is taken before or after the holidays.
  • You give staff a closing date for leave applications.
  • You base the leave priorities on pre-set criteria that might include seniority, need, performance and reasons for the leave. For example, a senior level employee who wants to attend a close friend’s wedding would probably receive priority over a junior employee who asks for time off to see a concert.

3. Let your stars shine

Instead of keeping your best staff busy on tasks that don’t directly contribute to higher sales, arrange the workload to maximise their customer interaction. Chances are they’ll be happier and more productive, too, if customer service is their strength.

This may require you to rethink when and how routine tasks get done so you don’t take your stars away from serving the customers. For example, we spoke to a hairdressing salon manager who hires extra cleaning help during the busy pre-holiday rush so the stylists can focus on the clients and not on cleaning up. This has the added benefit of keeping the salon look neat and clean, even on the busiest days.

4. Make breaks easy

Your employees need their breaks – especially when it’s busy – so they can continue to provide the level of service your customers expect. Make sure you’re clear with them about how and when breaks will happen. It’s critical that you manage breaks so that your key customer contact points are never understaffed.

If you rotate breaks and encourage employees to return on time, staff will feel they’ve been treated fairly and haven’t been overworked. You can make things easier for your staff by, for example, organising food supplied to your premises during the busiest periods so employees don’t have to spend time fighting crowds.

Remind your team always to take their breaks out of sight of customers, so you avoid the unwelcome situation of customers waiting for service while they can see your employees on a break.

5. Expect the unexpected

Even the best-laid plans can fall apart in the pressure of the holiday season, so it helps to have some contingency plans when it comes to staffing. Ahead of time, work out what could go wrong and what you could do about it if it did. Even if you’ve only rehearsed a situation in your head, you are less likely to panic when things go off the rails, making it easier to get back on track when needed.

It would be great to be able to say ‘Wave my magic wand and you won’t have any problems’ but real life doesn’t usually work that way. However, by planning ahead and using your imagination, you may find can have both happy customers and happy staff this holiday season!

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

360 degree feedback surveys can work for you

Here at Balance at Work, we recently managed a 360 degree feedback survey that saw 1360 feedback surveys completed for 157 managers. Along the way, we learnt a few lessons about what can go wrong with a 360 degree feedback project and ways to make the process much smoother in the future.

Here’s a short list of tips to help you get the most out of your next 360 degree feedback exercise.

1. Explain to everyone what a 360 feedback survey is and why they are doing it

Before doing anything, it is important that you tell everybody who is being assessed and everyone providing feedback the basics of what a 360 is and how it works. We had several people confused about why they were asked to provide feedback for their line managers – they are so used to it only going one way. By providing a clear outline of the project and the expected outcomes, it will be more likely that the feedback given will be constructive and useful.

By providing a clear outline of the project and the expected outcomes, the feedback given is more likely to be constructive and useful.

2. Provide step-by-step instructions for every part of the 360 degree feedback process

Regardless of what system you use to conduct your 360 (we use Spidergap), it will take a little time for users to understand how to use it. In order to make sure you get the highest quality feedback, it is vital that all involved know what to expect in the process as well as what is expected of them.

We found it is Important to give instructions around the criteria for choosing feedback providers, relationship titles and hints for providing useful feedback. It is always better to give clear, comprehensive instructions than to leave it to chance.

3. Be careful about who is providing 360 degree feedback

One of the biggest obstacles to getting useful, meaningful feedback is the source of that feedback. Having a balance between all relationships to the person being assessed is vital to making it a real 360. It is also important that those providing feedback feel confident in their ability to assess the person in question.

We had comments that people didn’t know someone well enough to feel comfortable providing feedback, a situation that would be avoided with more care in feedback provider selection.

For example, questions about internal management procedures will be confusing if you are including customers in the survey. Feedback providers can make or break a survey, so consider carefully who you want to involve and what you hope to gain from their perspective.

By following these 3 simple steps, you can ensure your 360 degree feedback survey process runs smoothly.

For our client, our experience contributed to the value of the survey. Here’s the feedback we received at the end of the project from Chris Bulmer, National GM Learning and Development, ISS Australia:

Susan and Harriet are the ideal external partners for us as they completely get what we as an organization are trying achieve in the People and Culture space. Their flexibility and responsiveness to our needs has seen the entire 360 approach being a complete success. The online tool worked well and the follow up coaching sessions that we have deployed have been game changers for our business. The buzz in the organization is outstanding. Love it! Thanks again for being such great support crew on this key project.

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What’s your story? #8: Susan Toole

What's your story?

Susan TooleWhat’s your current position and what do you do?

Admin / Bookkeeper for Balance at Work Pty Ltd and Corptraining. HR Coordinator for Thorndale Foundation Limited.

For my admin / bookkeeping roles, I try and balance the numbers and provide ‘behind the scenes’ support for two small businesses. I started with Susan at Balance at Work almost six years ago. The role has allowed me to venture back into the workforce on a part-time basis, whilst my children were still young. Susan introduced me to Nikki Heald at Corptraining three years later, where I do very similar work. Both these employers allow me the flexibility to juggle their needs along with the needs of three young children and a husband, which is most important to me!

While I continue to work for Susan and Nikki, I started with the Thorndale Foundation just over six months ago in quite a different position as their HR Coordinator.  Thorndale provides support services to (primarily) adults with disabilities in the forms of residential housing, day programs and our Australian Disability Enterprise which gives them the opportunity for employment. There is a lot of paperwork involved, and an understanding of budgets/accounting has served me well so far!

I’m very fortunate that I really like the people I work for so going to work is never a chore!

What other activities are you involved in?

Currently, I am Treasurer (previously registrar) for St Finbar’s Netball Club, Glenbrook and I also volunteer for Combined Districts Kart Club – as Lap Scorer/Timing Official, Event Assistant and Canteen Helper.

Previously I have also been the Secretary, Treasurer and President of our local preschool when my children attended. It was while I was President that the preschool’s Director resigned and it was the committee’s responsibility to find a replacement.  After managing the process to the interview stage, I asked Susan to join our interview panel as our HR expert. During the project, she recognised my capabilities and not long afterwards, asked me to assist her at Balance at Work.

My volunteer work with the go-kart club also led to my employment at Thorndale. As some of my volunteering had been in an administrative capacity, I was able to demonstrate my potential as an HR Coordinator to the President of the go-kart club, who is also the CEO of Thorndale.  For me, it’s definitely been a case of “who you know” as a flow-on effect of volunteering.

Is that what you expected to be doing when you were at school?

To be honest, I never really knew what career I wanted when I was at school. I never felt a passion for anything that would drive me down a certain career path.  I was good at Maths and English so felt that I could take those skills with me anywhere, primarily in an office environment.  After I completed Year 12 in NSW, I moved with my parents to Queensland where they enrolled me in a Business College to give me more practical skills for an office, such as touch typing and shorthand.

I did start a Bachelor of Commerce as a mature-age student in Qld, but personal circumstances required me to relocated back to NSW so I didn’t finish that degree. Interestingly enough, my majors were in Human Resources and Industrial Relations which are so relevant to my position at Thorndale.

What was your first job?

My first paid job was on a Saturday morning at a local petrol station from the age of 14. I had the 7.00am to 12.00pm shift which then allowed me to head off to the netball courts for a game at 1pm. Whilst I occasionally filled up someone’s car with petrol and checked their oil, I was mainly behind the register. After my shift, I had to balance my cash register totals before I could leave. If I was out of balance, it meant a longer time there to re-check my figures so if I wasn’t spot on, I was late for the game!

My first full-time position was as a Junior Secretary in Brisbane for an Insurance Broker. It took me two trains and a car trip (and a fair chunk of my pay!) to get to work, but I had a truly lovely boss who I enjoyed working for so it was worth it until I could move closer to work.

Can you tell us about a significant turning point in your career/life?

No doubt having children! My husband and I made the decision that I would be a ‘stay at home Mum’ to raise our children, which I was quite happy with for about ten years.  However, once they grew out of the baby stage and developed some independence, I knew I wanted to return to the workforce on a part-time basis and develop some of my own independence.

Who do you admire? Who has inspired you?

Like a previous career story, I also admire Richard Branson.  His quote “Clients do not come first. Employees come first. If you take care of the employees, they will take care of the clients” is something so many employers still need to learn.

My friends and family also know I am a Disney freak, so my other choice would be Walt Disney.  My favourite Disney quotes are very simple:  “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing” and “Keep moving forward”.

If there were no limitations, what would be in the future for you?

If money was not an obstacle and my husband agreed, I would love to have my own animal shelter for both cats and dogs (or any animal that had been mistreated or was at risk).  We have our own little menagerie at home – one dog, three cats, two chickens and a budgie – who all bring a sense of peace and happiness to our household.  They are all well looked after and very spoilt. I would love to bring a sense of that to other less fortunate animals.

Paradox theory and team dynamics

This article was originally written and posted by Dr Dan Harrison. You can read the original version here.

In today’s specialised work environment, talent is not enough. Talented people must effectively work together in order for the organization to succeed. HR budgets are tight and finding the right combination of talented people who can work together day in and day out to achieve positive results is difficult. As any good sports team knows, getting the right talent on the team in the right positions working together is imperative.

Harrison Assessments Paradox Theory reveals team dynamics in a way that has never before been possible, enabling individual team members to easily identify how their own behaviors contribute or obstruct the team objectives.

Harrison Assessments Paradox Theory provides a greater depth of psychological understanding because it reveals an entire system of behavior rather than merely offering insights about specific traits. It also predicts stress behavior and providesa framework that facilitates objective understanding of self and a clear direction for self-development.

It provides a step-by-step plan in which each team member can make adjustments to facilitate optimal team performance.

In essence, HA is a team building tool to achieve the following:

• Create teams with effective interactions.
• Discover the strengths and challenges of a team including team decision-making potential.
• Identify the best roles for each team member
• Assess the potential for cooperation or conflict.
• Establish clear guidelines for effective interactions.

HA can predict how people will:

• Communicate, influence and lead
• Handle autonomy
• Take personal initiative
• Resist or facilitate change
• Handle conflict
• Seek to learn, grow, and excel
• Plan and organize…and much more.

Using Harrison Assessments to choose and develop the right team in the right way is a major step in meeting the overall mission of your organization. Contact us today if you’d like to know more.

How to get ROI for workplace training

workplace training

Remember the last time you organised workplace training for your team? If you’re like most businesses, there was probably some tipping point that led you to hire a trainer or send staff to a workshop.

Whether it’s due to client feedback or concerns about staff productivity, a common scenario is a small ‘niggle’ that festers and grows until someone decides they’ve had enough and it’s time to throw some money at it in the hope the situation will improve.

There may also be more than a little wishful thinking in the mix because the problem’s now shared with a third party who might just have a magical solution.

Unfortunately there is no magic wand! However, here are some ideas you can use next time to ensure you’re spending your learning-and-development dollars wisely.

1. Identify outcomes

You’ve briefed a trainer and organised the venue, catering and participants. Great! Now, before the session, you should spend at least as much time deciding how you will know if the training has been effective.What are your measures of success? What’s the goal you’d like to achieve?

Think about the appropriate targets that you can measure both before and after the session. For a time-management workshop in a professional service business, for example, this may be the number of client calls, completed tasks or new proposals in a given time period. Once you’ve determined your measures, record your starting figures.

2. Have the right people in the room

It may seem obvious to you which staff need to attend the training, but don’t be afraid to think laterally.

In the time-management example above, it makes sense to broaden your scope to other team members who will impact the staff you want to train. Despite all the best information and intentions, your training attendee won’t have a hope of managing their time better if they are continually interrupted by their peers or even by a micromanaging boss (which does happen). Do other staff need to be in the room too?

3. Monitor and measure

Most businesses do a great job of collecting participant feedback at the end of a training session. This is useful information, but nowhere near as important as what happens when the post-workshop enthusiasm wanes and reality hits. Then it’s time to pull out your targets from the first step above and decide on the time frames for measuring performance against the targets. You will then have the data you need for making decisions not only about the return on investment, but also about future training and coaching needs.

Smaller businesses don’t typically assess the effectiveness of training. It’s not because they don’t care about getting value for money — it’s because they haven’t thought through how it could be done. With these ideas for getting ROI on your training dollar, you can make it a priority for your next training program.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visitwww.myob.com/blog.

What’s your story? #7: Chris Bulmer

What's your story?

The latest addition to our series of career path stories features Chris Bulmer, National General Manager, Learning and Development, for ISS Facility Services.

As a  definite ‘people’ person, Chris’ career has progressed from farmhand to school teacher to where he is now, changing the working lives of his many and diverse peers. He’s not quite the famous rock musician he wanted to be as a teenager – but he’s still a ‘star’!

Do you know someone whose career story should reach a wider audience?  Please drop us a line to let us know!

Chris Bulmer

What’s your current position and what do you do?

I am National General Manager Learning and Development for ISS Facility Services.

The role is fairly new to the business and has been created to build a comprehensive Learning and Development platform for all team members to access in our organization. In two years we have created a learning structure that ensures that our people have access to training and development that supports their career path growth from Line level all the way through to senior leadership.

Its seems to be working well as our Employee Engagement scores relating to L&D have increased year on year since we started and for the past two years consecutively we have won the prestigious Customer Service Institute of Australia Training Excellence Awards!

What other activities are you involved in?

I have two great boys and spend a lot of my spare time on Mountain Bikes and riding the Gold Coast waves. My wife and I enjoy nice wines and we make sure that we all get away twice a year on overseas trips. Just back from Miami and New York City. I am a keen guitar player and enjoy playing music with friends when the opportunity arises.

Is this what you expected to be doing when you were at school?

No !!!!  I wanted to be a famous rock musician! I played in many bands before settling into life as a school teacher and ultimately the world of People and Culture.

What was your first job?

Farm hand on Dad’s farm. Free labour!! Musician was my first paying job and then teacher.

Can you tell us about a significant turning point in your career/life?

Meeting my wife Karen. I was messing around a lot and had no specific purpose apart from exploring the world and getting as much human experience as I could. When Karen and I got together I got focussed on career, owning a home and having a family. I still explore the world a lot as I am constantly travelling…. And take the family with me when I can.

Who do you admire? Who has inspired you?

My Father. He inspired me to have a go and work hard. He provided opportunities for me that he never had. Education was important to Dad as he had to leave school early to run his Dad’s farm. Thanks to him I got to go to Melbourne Uni and get a couple of Degrees. That made him very proud.

If there were no limitations, what would be in the future for you?

To successfully climb Mount Everest.

Finally, what would you tell your younger self about work and careers?

Never waste a minute of your life doing stuff that you don’t want to do or is boring. Pursue your Passion and never give up until you have nailed your goals and dreams. Don’t take yourself too seriously, have fun and always be good to your people!!

Harrison Career Navigator Training in Melbourne

Are you curious about the Harrison Assessments career reports?

Are you thinking of using Career Navigator with your clients, but not sure how to start? Needing to update your knowledge?

Our new quick start course for career professionals is the perfect answer. After just a few hours, you’ll be ready to use the Harrison Career Navigator System confidently and effectively.

AGENDA

  • Theoretical background
  • Career reports –
    • Career Options
    • Career Development
    • Career Enjoyment
    • Your Greatest Strengths
  • Career Navigator System
  • Using your own system
  • Growing your practice

Limited spaces available – book early

Day: Thursday 3rd December 2015

Time: 1-4 pm

Venue:    Meeting Room 1

Library at the Dock

107 Victoria Harbour Promenade

Docklands, Melbourne

Cost: $220 (incl GST)

RSVP: by Friday 20 November 2015

Contact: Susan Rochester – susanr@balanceatwork.com.au

For more information, click here

Are you on the career cycle of doom?

This is a phenomenon I’ve observed recently. Perhaps it applies to you.

If you are good at your job and work hard, you will, hopefully, be recognised and promoted. Then, at some point, your career comes to a grinding halt even though you’re more technically competent and working harder than ever before. Unfortunately, it’s a familiar pattern for many young professionals.

What are the outcomes of this mindset?

1. You take on more and more work to prove that you can handle it

Alternative: Take on more and more responsibility but make sure you have others around you sharing the load.

2. You neglect the obvious

Alternative: Take the time to really listen and observe what’s happening around you, so you’re across what’s really going on.

3. You lose the connection

Alternative: Learn about your team and take an interest in them as people. If they know you care about them, they’ll be more inclined to help you when you need it.

How do you get off the ‘cycle of doom’?

If you keep going this way, there is no way out.

As you work longer hours to get more done, all your energy is focussed on doing the operational and there’s none left for being strategic. On top of that, there’s no time or space allowed for reflection and growth.

With no time to reflect, you’ll stay stuck in your hard-working comfort zone.

That doesn’t sound (or feel) like a comfort zone, but it is! You are doing more of what you know instead of risking doing something different.

Are you ready to take a risk and try a different way? Your career trajectory can and will change – so do it before you burn out!

If you really want to escape the ‘cycle of doom’, we’re here to help. Give us a call!

What’s your story? #6: Chris Barton

What's your story?

Chris BartonWhat’s your current position and what do you do?

CEO of StartHere Pty Ltd, incorporating Rewardshere.com.au, PricePal.com.au and soon to be released folo.world.  We are a shopping technology business that allows consumers to receive a cash discount when they shop online and for companies and charities to use our white labelled solution as a fundraising and loyalty tool.

What other activities are you involved in?

I love spending the little spare time I have today with my kids and am involved in their sports activities such as Tae Kwon Do and Athletics and also playing sport myself, my latest interest is distance walking and trekking.

I also like to assist Not for Profits with business and marketing assistance as a way of giving back.

Is this what you expected to be doing when you were at school?               

I had no ideas what I wanted to do when I was at school, although I did go to Uni and get a teaching degree. I am not a believer in having clear career paths as I believe it boxes people in.  I think that most successful and happy contributors in our workforce understand what skills, strengths and weaknesses they have and find ways to make use of those skills by filling needs. I am more a believer in individuals building their ongoing skills and then understanding how to best market these to employers or through starting your own business.

What was your first job?

I stacked shelves at Franklins supermarkets!

Can you tell us about a significant turning point in your career/life?

The biggest turning point I had in my career/life was the day that I stopped working for money and started following my Purpose. I strongly believe if you follow your purpose and are successful at what you do other rewards like the money will follow.

Who do you admire? Who has inspired you?

I admire my parents, as they created the foundations and moral compass that I base my life on. I am inspired by my wife every day and particularly by those in our society who aren’t afraid to carve out their own path.

If there were no limitations, what would be in the future for you?

I am a strong believer that we all should live every day as if we have no limitations and I attempt to follow this consistently. Most limitations are self-imposed and can be easily removed. As soon as we remove these barriers from our thinking anything is possible. I think we should all get up every day with the belief that nothing can stop us achieving what we set after.

Finally, what would you tell your younger self about work and careers?

Understand your purpose, follow your own path, don’t replicate others and most of all have fun.

 

"The last couple of years at batyr has seen incredible growth and the Balance at Work team has supported us along the way. They have helped us improve leadership skills across the team by helping us source and manage mentors, and even engaging as mentors themselves. As a young and fresh CEO Susan has also supported me personally with genuine feedback and fearless advice to achieve great things. "
By Sam Refshauge, CEO, batyr
"We used the Harrison Assessment tools followed by a debrief with Susan, for career development with staff, which then allowed us to work with Susan to create a customised 360 degree review process. Susan has a wealth of knowledge and is able to offer suggestions and solutions for our company. She is always ready to get involved and takes the time to show her clients the capability of Harrison Assessments. "
By Jessica Hill, Head of People and Culture, Choice
"Balance at Work are the ideal external partners for us as they completely get what we are trying achieve in the People and Culture space. Their flexibility and responsiveness to our needs has seen the entire 360 approach being a complete success. The online tool and the follow up coaching sessions have been game changers for our business. The buzz in the organisation is outstanding. Love it! Thanks again for being such a great support crew on this key project."
By Chris Bulmer, National GM Learning and Development, ISS Australia
"We use Harrison Assessments with our clients to support their recruitment processes. We especially value the comprehensive customisable features that allow us to ensure the best possible fit within a company, team and position. Balance at Work is always one phone call away. We appreciate their valuable input and their coaching solutions have also given great support to our clients."
By Benoit Ribe, HR Solutions Manager, Polyglot Group
"The leadership team at Insurance Advisernet engaged Susan from Balance at Work to run our leadership development survey and learning sessions. Susan was very professional in delivering the team and individual strengths and opportunities for growth. Susan's approach was very "non corporate" in style which was refreshing to see. I can't recommend Balance at Work more highly to lead, employee and team development sessions."
By Shaun Stanfield, Managing Director, Insurance Advisernet

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