Category Archives: Recruitment

7 steps to bring new employees on board

succession

Many quality new employees can leave an organisation within the first few months if an organisation doesn’t have a structured onboarding process.

Like any relationship, it’s likely that your new hires are deciding whether they’ll stay or go within the first few months.

Can you afford to have them leave when you’ve just invested in hiring them?

Why do new hires decide to leave?

Common reasons employees decide to leave within the first few months are:

  • They don’t receive clear guidelines about their responsibilities
  • They thought they should have received better training
  • They found coworkers were not as friendly or helpful as they expected
  • They felt they weren’t recognised for their contributions
  • They weren’t included in an effective onboarding process

You can lessen the chances of having key talent walk away within the first few months with an effective onboarding process.

It’s not something to be left until the day your recruit starts work.

Get the early steps wrong, and you may find you’re the only one showing up on their first day.

Before you recruit

1. Create a guide to working in your organisation

You don’t need to make it too detailed or heavy. What’s most important is to let people know about what you do, why and with whom.

Describe the company culture, including what it takes to be successful in your organisation. This guide will also help you during the recruitment process to articulate why candidates would want to work for you.

2. Be clear about the role

If you don’t know what this job is about, how can you give candidates an accurate picture of what the work entails? Don’t fall into the trap of believing a good recruit will work it out for themselves, bringing their skills and experience to bear.

A few stars may do this, but the majority prefer to know what they might be committing to before they start.

During recruitment

3. Tell the truth

Paint an accurate picture of your organisation, the role and your expectations. If you’ve completed steps one and two, this will be easy. If not, it’s not too late.

Just make sure you avoid the temptation to ‘talk up’ the job and organisation to attract an outstanding candidate. Down that path lies disappointment for both parties.

4. Choose carefully

Selecting a person for a role who doesn’t fit your culture may work in the short run, but sooner or later you will find yourself recruiting again.

No matter how skilled or experienced the candidate, if their values, attitudes and personality don’t align with those of your organisation, you are sabotaging this important new working relationship before it starts.

READ: Calculating the costs of hiring the wrong person

Once they start

5. Provide a warm welcome

Introduce your new hire as early as possible to their coworkers and key stakeholders, including customers. Promote their skills and why you’ve hired them. From the outset, treat them as a valued member of your team.

For example, listen to and value their opinions, and ensure you include them in all relevant communication and social events.

6. Get the basics right

Starting a new job can be quite daunting. Make the transition easier for your latest staff member by making sure of the following:

  • All the equipment and software they need is available, accessible and working
  • Information resources such as policies, procedures, checklists and FAQs are up to date and easy to find
  • They know who they can ask if they need help. Consider providing a buddy or coach for the first month.

7. Plan the experience and follow through

Set up a schedule before they start that includes adequate time for goal-setting, work hand-over, training, and reviewing progress and performance.

Include the names of people responsible for each step, and share the schedule with your new employee. This way, you will show you’ve thought of all the steps above and start on a positive note

Most importantly, set aside time to spend with them — not just on their first day but on a regular basis. You might be surprised how much you will learn from them!

There are many reasons employees leave a job, but poor onboarding shouldn’t be one of them.

These seven basic steps are easy to implement, and could make a positive difference in your employee turnover.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

Three steps to hiring for the culture you want to create

assessments for recruiting

Have you ever tried to change the culture of your organisation? Wouldn’t hiring for cultural fit in the first place be better?

Some of the consulting work we do centres around changing an organisation’s culture – something which is ingrained and difficult to budge.

But what if you could set the culture from the moment you hire somebody?

If culture is ‘the way we do things around here’, then it’s not beyond your power to design it for your organisation.

One place to start is with your hiring and selection processes.

Technical ability and soft skills usually take pride of place when we hire.

While I don’t dispute these are basic and important, ignoring cultural fit can be where the seemingly perfect match comes unstuck. How can you avoid this trap?

1. Know what culture you want to create

What’s important to you in your work and your dealings with colleagues, clients and suppliers? How do you want the world to see your organisation?

There are as many answers to these questions as there are organisations!

One may focus on delivering their product or service as efficiently and inexpensively as possible.

Another may highlight the importance of staff engagement to deliver the best client and financial outcomes.

At Balance at Work, for example, we pride ourselves on how much we care about our clients and are known for going ‘above and beyond’ to help them achieve their objectives.

This attitude is the foundation of our culture and helps us identify who we want to attract, employ and work with daily.

2. Have a strategy for finding the right people

Once you’ve defined the culture you seek, it’s time to ensure you are seeking staff who align with your culture.

There are several parts of the recruitment and selection process that give you the opportunity to make decisions related to getting the best cultural fit:

  • The advertisement: Make it reflective of your culture, not a cookie-cutter generic ad. Also, be honest. Only use the phrase ‘fun place to work’ if it actually is.
  • Screening resumes: Look for experience, interests and skills that indicate a good fit, including those outside their employment. For example, if it’s important in your culture to help others, then look for volunteering. If teamwork is important, what have they done that shows it’s important to them too?
  • Interview: The interview is your big chance to describe the culture and to ask questions specifically aimed at finding out more about cultural fit. Make sure you are using behavioural questions that give the candidate an opportunity to describe how they work.
  • Objective assessments: Using psychometric surveys that cover values and motivations will help you see how well the candidate’s views align with your culture.
  • Reference checking: Get in the habit of asking referees to describe the culture in the candidate’s previous or current workplace(s). Tip: you also need to ask the candidate why they wanted to leave. Often it’s the culture that has driven them away. If your culture is different, you now have a great way to attract them to work for you if they meet all your other selection criteria.

3. Get help

You can easily get feedback on your culture, what works and what doesn’t, from your existing staff and other stakeholders.

They’re also well-placed to help you identify what you need (and don’t need) in your new hires to build your desired culture. Some questions you could ask:

  • How would you describe our culture to someone who doesn’t know our organisation?
  • What are the qualities you think a person needs to be an excellent fit for our culture?

Armed with this information, you can then fine-tune your recruitment and selection processes to screen for cultural fit.

Want to create the culture of your dreams? It all starts with the right people.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

Three signs it’s time to hire

Killing the business you love

“When should we hire our next team member?” is one of the questions businesses most often ask as they grow and evolve. Unfortunately, there’s no one simple answer.

There’s also no guarantee that it will work out.

Sometimes the decision to hire is more a matter of luck and serendipity rather than cold, hard planning.

For example, at Balance at Work we took on a new consultant because she happened to be available at a time when we needed help.

Doing this goes against everything I tell our clients they should do, but it has worked very well for us — this time, at least!

If you’d like to have more science around this critical decision, look out for the signs.

If you’re experiencing any of the following, alone or in combination, it might be time for you to hire one or more new employees.

1. You’re consistently not delivering on your service promises

There can be several reasons your customers are not getting the quality, response times and levels of service they’re expecting.

If all these things were previously running smoothly and now aren’t, perhaps your staff just don’t have the time and resources they need to serve your customers properly.

An increase in any of the following requires you to look closely at the causes and determine if the problem could be solved by hiring:

  • Late delivery of goods or services
  • Projects that are running over time and over budget
  • Complaints and refunds
  • Disputed invoices or late payments
  • Needing to re-do work that’s already been paid for and delivered

2. You and your team are feeling overwhelmed

If you’re awake at 2am worrying about work, something has to give. Hopefully, it won’t be you!

No growing business can go it alone, and if you just saw yourself in that first sentence, my first recommendation is to find yourself a business coach as soon as possible.

On the other hand, you may feel totally in control while your team is giving you signs things are not quite as they should be.

If you notice any of the following behaviours, take the time to find out why it’s occurring:

  • Sudden resignations
  • Unexplained absences
  • Bickering within the team
  • Low morale and a negative vibe
  • Rumours about the future of the business

Once you know that coping with the workload is the underlying issue, you’re ready to take appropriate action.

3. You’re experiencing rapid growth or change

Congratulations! Sometimes we choose to change and sometimes change is thrust upon us. Either way, change brings with it significant opportunities to do things differently.

You can only make the most of your situation if you have the right people on your team.

Some of the business changes that indicate you need to hire more staff are:

  • Increased demand for your existing service or product
  • New services or products added to your catalogue
  • Implementing new processes or structures that require new skill sets

If you find you’re working ‘in the business’ instead of ‘on the business’ most of the time, over a long time, you are setting yourself up for failure.

In fact, failure is almost inevitable if you don’t get to do the important work in your business, instead of just what’s urgent.

It’s a big step to hire a new team member, and doing so requires careful planning.

It can be expensive, and it will be time-consuming.

So we ask ‘Do I really need to hire?’ instead of ‘Can I afford not to?’. When you refer to the signs above, it’s easier to answer both questions.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

Culture: How do you assess fit?

This article is by Dan Harrison, Founder and CEO of Harrison Assessments International and was first published on 2 March 2017. If you are interested in learning more, please contact us.

High performing organizations can be quite obsessive about their culture as both a market differentiator and as a guiding force for decision-making. These organizations tend to be extremely careful to bring new people in who match the culture well.

By “culture”, we can use this definition: “the organization’s vital Purpose, its distinctive and enduring Philosophy and its strategic Priorities”  – the 3 P’s, according to Sheila Margolis [1]. A strong culture will endure and thrive if employees’ own beliefs and values align well with the organizational culture. If there is poor alignment, then the culture degrades and competitive edge may be lost.

Job-Fit vs. Culture-Fit

In the employee-selection world, professional Talent Management staff often focus on understanding the job in question by conducting a Job Analysis (JA). JA typically involves identifying the tasks, duties and responsibilities performed on the job as well as the specific knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA’s) that lead to success. Once the KSA’s are identified, a selection plan can be devised to “test” for these competencies and a “score” or predictor of potential success in the job is derived. The test can include a online assessment to determine probable job-fit. Certainly job-fit is critical to determine to ensure that the candidate both CAN do the job and WILL do the job (i.e. is motivated to perform).

Certainly, ensuring that a candidate has the technical skills, know-how, background, education and even “soft” or people-skills to be successful is critical. What many organizations fail to do, however, is assess for culture-fit. That is, applying assessment strategies to measure the extent to which a individual’s values, beliefs and priorities align with and complement those of the organization. In many cases, culture-fit is is just as important as Job-fit, if not more so.

What is Culture-Fit?

Person-Organization, or Culture-Fit is the congruence of an individual’s beliefs and values with the culture, norms, and values of an organization. Entrepreneur Magazine says that culture is, “the personality of an organization from the employee perspective, and includes the company’s mission, expectations and work atmosphere.” [2]

Employers are now competing hotly for the best and the brightest younger workers. We know from recent research on younger workers that they highly value People and Culture Fit above all else. They want to be comfortable with like-minded people in an environment that matches their own passions, interests and personal and professional values. If the employer can get their culture right, defined and clearly articulated then they are in a much better position to match the employer’s needs with younger workers expectations – a win-win proposition!

What Does it Matter?

Research consistently shows that employees who understand the company culture and are aligned with it outperform the competition by a three-fold factor. Aligned employees:

  • Are happier
  • More satisfied
  • Stay longer
  • Are committed
  • Provide better service

Person-Job vs. Person-Organization Fit

If we accept the idea that job fit is critical AND that culture-fit also plays a role in an individual’s potential success, then how are these two ideas related? The chart right attempts to address this question. Person-job fit can be determined using skills tests, competency analysis, behavioral interviewing and even resume/application review. Person-organization fit requires asking and getting answers to different questions – mostly about what is most important to an individual both in terms of their engagement as well as their priorities and core values.

Can One Assessment Do Both?

Certainly, multiple assessment methods can accomplish job and organization fit; for example, using one assessment for competency assessment and another one for values and engagement factors could work. This approach is time-consuming, expensive and cumbersome, not to mention a possible “turn-off” to candidates. In a perfect world, we could use one assessment to give us all the information we need in a short amount of time. In fact, such an assessment exists – the Harrison Assessment.

How can the Harrison Assessment Accomplish Both Goals?

Because the Harrison Assessment (HA) is preference-based, and uses forced-ranking as a method, it collects very detailed information about an individual’s work-related preferences in a very short amount of time (less than 30 minutes). Everyone takes the same questionnaire. What changes is the filter, or Success Formula, that is applied to the individual’s data set. In terms of Person-Job Fit, there are thousands of Job Success Formulas in the system that are specific to the demands of unque jobs. In terms of Person-Organization Fit, the system can be set up to filter for core values, engagement factors and motivational triggers. This filter can be applied to the same data.

Culture Mapping and Assessment Example

Let’s apply this process to a real-world example. Consider Company X that has 5 Core Values that they want to make sure new employees have the propensity for and embrace at a personal level. The first of those Core Values is shown below and is called Innovative Ideas and Approaches. The document below shows how this value and its definition was mapped to HA. This work was performed by a trained HA consultant. This was done for all 5 of the Core Values, though only one is shown here for the purposes of this example.

Example Core Value and Mapping to the Harrison Assessment with rationale included.

This “culture template” was created in the HA system and could then be run for any or all finalists or new employees to show how much their own personal preferences and priorities stacked up against the ideal. In the partial report shown below, you can see the individual’s match-up against this customized cultural filter (note that this report ran several pages; this is just the first page). The hiring manager, and/or interviewer could use these results to probe areas that may have been weaker for this person, or “out-of-sync” with respect to the cultural values. The report also includes traits-to-avoid that can possibly de-rail success.

In this way, organizations can use the same dataset collected by one questionnaire in multiple ways; First, to assess fit for the job itself; second, to look at culture fit. It is true that some set-up needs to be done to do the customization work to create the cultural, or values filter, but once set-up, this is a very efficient, effective, time-saver that is also inexpensive.

Visit our website to find out more about both Job-fit and Culture-fit

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[1] Sheila Margolis, Defining Organizational Culture Questions (https://sheilamargolis.com/consulting/organizational-culture-change-initiatives/organizational-culture-assessment-questions/)

[2] “It Really Pays to have a Rich Company Culture”, Entrepreneur Magazine, 10/21/14, (https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/238640)

Is the Harrison Assessment like MBTI?

career help

This is a common question from people who are familiar with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test.  Both systems look at an individual’s preferences or tendencies, however there are some fundamental differences between them.  Dr Dan Harrison provided his insights into the two tools.

The major difference is that MBTI was designed to be used as a personality assessment tool only, while Harrison Assessments (HA) is a job suitability tool based on the work context.  HA measures work preferences, motivations, values, work environment preferences and interests, in addition to personality.

  • In MBTI, respondents are type-cast into one of the 16 types, based on 4 dichotomies. HA does not type cast because in doing so, it would seriously limit its usefulness for recruitment and employee/career development.
  • MBTI was not developed for the work environment and consequently the questions are not fully designed to be work focused. The HA questions are work focused.
  • MBTI analyses norms based on different populations. HA analyses individual traits in relationship to performance for a wide variety of different job functions. Each role or career is benchmarked against employees in relevant roles to find the traits that contribute to job satisfaction and high performance as well as potential derailers.
  • MBTI uses bi-polar scales which assume an either/or relationship between traits. HA uses Paradox technology which allows for the person to be either, neither or both. The Paradox scales provide a deep insight into behavioural competencies as well as stress behaviours and even unconscious tendencies.
  • MBTI scales provide a surface view of personality. The paradox technology clearly measures negative tendencies whereas MTBI isn’t designed to do so. Because of the use of the bi-polar scale any conclusion regarding negative tendencies is more tentative.

MBTI is best used for team facilitation

The manufacturers state that the score on the MBTI does NOT relate to job success. Therefore, it has limited usefulness for career planning  or recruitment applications.

Human beings can be quite complicated as different factors interplay to drive their behaviour in different situations. The Harrison Assessment looks at 175 traits and examines the paradoxes in the tendencies. Its comprehensiveness facilitates awareness and development as one can zoom into a specific trait and context.

The HA reports enable you to increase effectiveness in career coaching, hiring and developing performance. They do not require a psychologist to interpret and anyone can easily learn to use the reports.

If you’re an experienced MBTI user and would like to explore further what makes Harrison Assessments so different, you can find out more here and here!

This is an update of a post that first appeared on this blog on18 May 2010

Hiring for customer relationship success

Relate to your boss

Customer relationships are so important — no matter what the role or organisation. 

When selecting staff, we may think that the technical skills they possess, their experience and their qualifications are most important in our decision-making process. We may pay less attention to the so-called ‘soft’ skills, and often this is where we see it all fall apart further down the track.

What should we look for when we’re hiring?

‘Nice’ is the enemy of excellence when it comes to choosing staff with the right traits to deliver the highest expected standards of service to your customers and their own peers and managers.

Excellent customer service in any role requires:

  • Empathy
    The ability to identify with another person and to express that empathy when dealing with customers and co-workers.
  • Optimism
    A positive outlook and an expectation that there can be a favourable outcome to any customer interaction, including complaints.
  • Self-motivation
    A natural tendency to take the initiative to help a client and to be enthusiastic about helping them — and a willingness to take on new challenges.
  • Helpfulness
    A natural inclination to put others’ needs first, so that the customer will always feel that they and their needs are important.
  • Diplomacy
    The ability to be tactful and communicate effectively in even the most stressful situations.
  • Outgoing
    Happy and comfortable to meet new people. Even a naturally reserved person may be able to be outgoing when required, provided this is not their main job.
  • Learning
    A willingness to learn from mistakes will lead to continuous improvement with benefits for your organisation.

How do we identify employees with these traits? 

At every stage of the recruitment and selection process, you can be on the lookout for signs of the characteristics above.

  • Application letter
    Do they demonstrate an enthusiasm for the role and the challenges it represents? Have they shown that they understand the role and your requirements?
  • Resume
    Does their work and study history show that they have a customer service orientation? Even if they haven’t worked in customer service, there will be indicators in the way they describe previous roles and in other aspects of their resume, such as voluntary work.
  • Interview
    While enthusiasm, politeness and a positive attitude are easily noticed, they are also sometimes easily faked. Make sure you dig deeper to get real examples of how the candidate has acted in the past to provide excellent customer service. When you do, be listening for evidence that they possess the traits we have listed above.
  • Work preference testing
    There are multiple psychometric assessments that are available which will give you detailed information about a person’s natural tendencies with regard to customer service success. Some will also flag any unhelpful behaviours that may appear when the person is feeling stressed.
  • Reference checking
    Make sure you ask about how the prospective employee usually interacted with customers and other staff. Have there been any instances where they have failed to provide the best service? What was the situation and how did they handle it? Did they learn from the experience?

It will never be possible to predict customer service success with 100 percent accuracy, but taking the steps above can help you identify and hire staff who have the best chances of delivering the levels of customer service you and your customers expect.

Remember, these steps are important for any person in any role that interacts with others.

What will you change next time you’re hiring?

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

Using assessments to recruit staff

assessments for recruiting

Assessments are being used more extensively by SMEs for selection, team building and staff development.

Here’s a quick rundown on the basics to help you choose an assessment with confidence.

What are assessments?

An assessment is any process that gives you a quantitative means of understanding how an individual thinks and behaves. They are typically used to measure the suitability of a candidate to a proposed or current role against predetermined characteristics deemed important for success by an employer, but they can also have wider application in any business.

Assessments can come in two forms: aptitude and ability tests, or personality and interest tests.

Aptitude and ability tests are aimed at determining if an individual is capable of performing a certain task. I think of these as the ‘Can they do it?’ type of test.

Personality and interest tests measure how a person would perform these tasks, as well as provide broader insights about how they interact with other people and their environment. To me, these are the ‘Will they do it?’ tests. For most employers, this is where an assessment can be very valuable because it gives you information, in advance, that is otherwise very difficult to uncover.

The outcome of the second type of assessment is usually a report that describes a person’s most likely behaviour in relation to certain criteria. The results will show whether or not a person meets your set criteria, as well as provide an insight into how they are likely to respond to certain situations.

Depending on the particular test, they can be used for recruitment, team building, succession planning and many other purposes.

Some people say they rely on assessments while others reject them outright.

Here are some of the reasons people feel the way they do:

Why use assessments?

  • Long-term payoff: While there may be an initial outlay for administering the test, it can save you in the long run by supporting better decisions.
  • Real deal: An assessment can give you a more accurate picture of a candidate than an interview.
  • Fairness: Because the tests are based on statistics, they treat each candidate equally and provide objective comparisons.
  • Beyond the test: Once the test is completed, the results can be a useful framework for further interview questions, reference-checking and onboarding.

Things to watch out for

  • Doubts about the methodology: There are many tests out there, but only a few can give you specific and relevant information, backed by benchmarked data.
  • Poor Training: If test administrators have been incorrectly or insufficiently trained, results can be easily misinterpreted.
  • Manipulation: All tests are not the same in terms of consistency checking, so it may be possible for candidates to cheat some of them.

How do you choose?

There are many assessments available.

Rather than being overwhelmed by all the details and comparisons, my advice is to choose a reputable provider with a test that has strong science behind it.

Make sure the assessment is easy to use and will give you the flexibility you need for a range of uses in your business.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

 

Calculating the costs of hiring the wrong person

hiring

How much does it cost you to fill a vacant role by hiring someone who’s not right for the job?

Without due consideration, the expense of recruitment will be wasted.

To make matters worse, you will have the added costs of time and money to go through the process again.

Here are the things to take into consideration when considering the costs of hiring the wrong person.

Identify your direct costs

The direct costs of replacing a departing employee include recruitment costs for advertising and recruiters, plus any termination payouts.

These costs will be incurred every time you hire somebody, whether they turn out to be the right fit for your business or not. The trick is to best invest your money to make sure you can get the right person.

Recognise your indirect costs

The indirect costs are less obvious but contribute a substantial proportion of the overall expense of hiring. They are also much harder to calculate.

Loss of productivity

It is highly likely that you will lose productivity while you have a vacant position, while someone is getting used to the workplace, and when someone has decided to leave his or her job.

While you have a vacant position the tasks previously assigned to the vacant role are abandoned, or taken on by another employee whose own productivity may suffer. A new employee will take time before they become sufficiently familiar with their job to achieve full productivity. In addition, the productivity of many employees falls while they are serving out their notice period.

When you have hired the wrong person, they will likely never reach what you consider to be full productivity in their time as an employee.

In-house costs of hiring

The tasks involved in recruitment that occur in-house are numerous and varied.

The steps for hiring the right person include:

  • drafting position descriptions
  • reading resumes
  • screening applications and advising candidate
  • carrying out interviews and debriefing
  • verifying qualifications, checking references and conducting pre-employment assessments.

In addition to hiring, you will need to account for the cost of induction and training a new employee.

The cost of all these tasks can be calculated by the hourly rate of each employee involved in the process, multiplied by the number of hours they spend on recruitment, induction or training.

Termination administration

The administration involved with the termination of an employee who proved to be wrong for the business is an important but costly process.

The cost of termination administration involves:

  • pay officer time to process termination pay
  • exit interviewer time
  • employee and line manager time to finish paperwork and return and check employer’s property
  • administration time for actions such as cancelling computer access.

Hiring is a costly exercise that will be a much more expensive when you hire the wrong person. Combining the direct costs of recruitment with the indirect costs of lost productivity, in-house costs of hiring, and termination administration shows you what you’ll waste by choosing the wrong person.

It makes sense (and cents!) to invest time and money up front to ensure you attract and select people who are right for your business.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

 

Three Keys to Job Satisfaction

This post originally appeared on the Harrison Assessments blog. For more posts like this, click here

It seems basic. If you like what you are doing it doesn’t feel so much like work. If you enjoy doing something you are more likely to continue doing it and do it well. So shouldn’t a personality assessment being used to measure job suitability include measuring work satisfaction?

Measuring work satisfaction is essential to determine motivation and forecast whether an individual will prosper, succeed and stay with the organization. Most behavioral and personality assessments fail to measure work satisfaction and are therefore limited to predicting personality.

Harrison Assessment’s twenty five plus years of research prove that employees who enjoy at least 75% or more of their job are almost 4 times more likely to succeed than employees who enjoy less than 75% of their job. Measuring factors related to work satisfaction makes it possible to predict job success and therefore hire, motivate and retain top talent.

Harrison Assessment’s Enjoyment-Performance methodology considers 3 key issues related to work satisfaction and retention, measuring the degree to which a person’s:

  1. Preferred tasks fit the job
  2. Interests fit the job
  3. Work environment preferences fit the job

Enjoyment and Performance are linked because the level of enjoyment that an employee has while performing a particular activity is directly related to the level of their performance relative to that activity.

When people enjoy a task, they tend to do it more, and get better at it. Like a self-fulfilling prophecy, good performance creates acknowledgment and/or positive self-regard which then causes people to enjoy the task even more.

Harrison Assessment solutions predict performance, work satisfaction and retention. They enable companies to motivate people and increase their performance by assigning the roles and responsibilities that give them the highest degree of work satisfaction. Harrison Assessments also enables companies to show their employees that they care about their work satisfaction. This genuine concern in itself evokes a positive response from employees. The mutually beneficial outcome is that both employees and employers win!

To find out more about using Harrison Assessments to measure and encourage work satisfaction contact us here

Avoiding the ‘Horror Hire’

This post originally appeared on the Harrison Assessments blog. For more posts like this, click here

If you think when you go for a job interview it is a nail-bitingly painful affair, imagine what it’s like for a manager who has to screen through all the job applications, narrow down the best and then conduct each and every interview while other tasks keep piling up!

Once the interview is over, all the job applicant has to do is wait patiently for the call that may or may not eventually come.

The manager on the other hand, has the task of deciding who is the best among the many hopefuls to fill the vacancy. If not using a job fit assessment there’s not much to go on. The stakes are high. If the right candidate is chosen, the company profits. The wrong one it can be a very expensive horror hire.

So how does one pick the person that is exactly the right fit for the job? And how sure are you that the person who ‘aced’ the test will actually pass with flying colors in the workplace, now and in the future?

Some might choose to go purely by gut instinct; others will base their decision on the recommendations of colleagues and friends. The results can be so very right or disastrously wrong as one small local engineering firm discovered to its dismay.

The firm had hired a manager who was highly recommended and who supposedly had chalked up quite an impressive resume working with multinational companies. The new manager was hired to help streamline the company’s operations but in the first three months, he behaved so arrogantly towards other staff, they refused to work with him and chaos ensued. The company was forced to terminate him only to discover that he had obtained the e-mail contacts of all their clients and associates which he then used to exact revenge.

He emailed allegations against the company to their clients and threatened to cause even more malicious damage to the company’s reputation, unless they paid for his silence! The enraged company was forced to hire outside expertise to investigate his background, counter his claim and fend off his allegations. They paid for a due diligence report to be conducted and forwarded the report to their clients. Then they hired a lawyer to block further action by the ex-employee.

With so much at stake today, it’s time for employers to ramp up the assessment process and cull those who misrepresent themselves. Using the Harrison Assessment can help you avoid the very expensive horror hire and keep your organisation profitable.

To find out more about using Harrison Assessments to make sure you don’t make a horror hire contact us here

Just Do It!

This post originally appeared on the Harrison Assessments blog. For more posts like this, click here.

“I HATE my work!” How successful do you think someone will be at a job who says this? “I don’t care if you hate it, just do it”. How long will this company be operating if this is the most frequent response from the team leader?

The Harrison Assessment’s Paradox Theory predicates that performance and enjoyment are closely linked, because when one enjoys doing something, one tends to do it more willingly and more often. This in turn makes one very competent in that task and thereby more effective in their particular job. Workers who have a great time doing whatever it is that captivates them, will be effective performers and ultimately add to the company’s success!

The key is to find what ‘turns on’ a particular worker and provide an environment where this is readily found and you’ll have a recipe for employee success for sure!

Harrison Assessments’ attraction is that it measures factors such as task preference (for example driving, computers, teaching, researching, manual type of work, physical work, working with numbers), work preference factors (such as outdoors, public contact, repetition), and interest factors (like finance/business, food, science, electronics).

What’s even better is that Harrison Assessments measures an amazing 175 factors which is some five times more than the tests offered by others. Harrison Assessments also boasts an 85% predictive accuracy, able to measure traits that are correlated to successful performance and  measure the presence of negative traits that can be counterproductive to successful performance.

What is the basic difference between “personality tests” and “job suitability tests”? Personality tests may predict that the person is a “nice and pleasant” person but being nice does not guarantee success or great performance on the job.

What are the ‘must haves’ when picking the right kind of assessment ‘tools’ to aid in the hiring process? A comprehensive recruitment tool kit would include a job analysis questionnaire, a profile analysis, a “Traits and Definitions” report, a behavioral impact graph and narrative, a paradox graph and narrative, positive or counterproductive traits of the applicant and probing for weaknesses.

Using a test such as Harrison makes it easier to narrow down the potential capabilities and areas of natural competence on the part of the job applicant.

More specifically it throws the spotlight on four important areas – ability (what he can do now and after training is given), aptitude (ability to gain a skill after training), power (reasoning ability) and performance (relating to one’s experience).

Finding the right candidate for a job is difficult. Using an assessment tool such as the Harrison can help save you time, money and a lot of headaches by helping you find someone who doesn’t say, “I hate this job”. And it will hopefully make it so your team leader does not have to say… “Just DO it”.

To find out more about using Harrison Assessments to find the right people for your business contact us here

New recruitment tools for small and growing businesses

recruitment

You need to recruit new staff, you have the budget and you have a plan. What’s next? In the past, you’d go straight to advertising or briefing a recruiter. Both are going to take time and cost money. New recruitment tools give you more control and streamline your sourcing and selection processes, even if you use a recruiter.

Sourcing

Job search databases: List your job on a service like Jobbed (free) OneShift (fee), Glassdoor (fee) or Jobseeker (free) instead of advertising through traditional channels to connect with candidates who have already listed their job search criteria. You can also search their databases to contact suitable recruits, for a fee. Some also provide apps for posting jobs and viewing candidates.

Applicant tracking systems: Love the idea of free postings but too time poor to set them up? There is an easier way! Services such as JobAdder or Adlogic make it easy for you to post your job on multiple free (and paid) platforms, including social media, and centralise all your applicant data for a monthly fee. Both these services include a mobile app to make recruitment even easier.

Social media: With a recent survey by recruitment agency Randstad showing that one in three jobseekers are using social media to find work, it can’t be ignored as a source of candidates especially if you are recruiting for tech-savvy employees. Facebook and LinkedIn are the main platforms for recruitment. At a minimum, you should ensure your personal and company profiles are attractive to potential new recruits. Just as networking in the real world can be a great source of good staff, networking in the virtual world is a very good way to locate candidates who might not yet be actively looking for a new job.

Selecting

Video interview software: Perfect for remote or first round interviews, services such as Vieple and TalentVX allow your candidates to record a video introduction or answers to questions you have listed for them. One advantage is the easy review and sharing of interviews to help you in your decision-making, allowing multiple stakeholders to have input without needing to be present at an interview.

Psychometric assessments: The options available to small and growing businesses are too numerous to list here, and your choice of tool will depend on where you want it to fit in your process and how much you want to spend. When selecting an assessment, look for a customisable, workplace research-based tool designed for recruitment that will answer the most important question: ‘Is this person the best fit for the job and our culture?’ Always keep in mind that a test result is just one part of your overall decision.

Background checks: Although checks on qualifications, previous employment and police records can certainly be outsourced (see Verify and PeopleCheck for example) I am not aware of tools that will fully automate this process for you. But I do recommend you check out Rapportive, a Google Chrome app, as a way of finding candidates’ social profiles and any connections you might already have to them, based on their email address.

No matter which tools you choose to use, you still have to put in time and effort to hire the right person. As in every other business activity, successful recruitment depends largely on having a clear picture of what you want before you start. None of the tools above can save you from this core business task. But they may just mean you make the right decisions along your recruitment path.

This article was originally published on MYOB’s blog, The Pulse. For more business news and tips, visit www.myob.com/blog.

 

"The last couple of years at batyr has seen incredible growth and the Balance at Work team has supported us along the way. They have helped us improve leadership skills across the team by helping us source and manage mentors, and even engaging as mentors themselves. As a young and fresh CEO Susan has also supported me personally with genuine feedback and fearless advice to achieve great things. "
By Sam Refshauge, CEO, batyr
"We used the Harrison Assessment tools followed by a debrief with Susan, for career development with staff, which then allowed us to work with Susan to create a customised 360 degree review process. Susan has a wealth of knowledge and is able to offer suggestions and solutions for our company. She is always ready to get involved and takes the time to show her clients the capability of Harrison Assessments. "
By Jessica Hill, Head of People and Culture, Choice
"Balance at Work are the ideal external partners for us as they completely get what we are trying achieve in the People and Culture space. Their flexibility and responsiveness to our needs has seen the entire 360 approach being a complete success. The online tool and the follow up coaching sessions have been game changers for our business. The buzz in the organisation is outstanding. Love it! Thanks again for being such a great support crew on this key project."
By Chris Bulmer, National GM Learning and Development, ISS Australia
"We use Harrison Assessments with our clients to support their recruitment processes. We especially value the comprehensive customisable features that allow us to ensure the best possible fit within a company, team and position. Balance at Work is always one phone call away. We appreciate their valuable input and their coaching solutions have also given great support to our clients."
By Benoit Ribe, HR Solutions Manager, Polyglot Group
"The leadership team at Insurance Advisernet engaged Susan from Balance at Work to run our leadership development survey and learning sessions. Susan was very professional in delivering the team and individual strengths and opportunities for growth. Susan's approach was very "non corporate" in style which was refreshing to see. I can't recommend Balance at Work more highly to lead, employee and team development sessions."
By Shaun Stanfield, Managing Director, Insurance Advisernet

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